Discovering da Vinci
“There are three classes of people: Those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see."

Which are you?
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  • "Man is the Model of the World"

    -Leonardo da Vinci

    What Leo meant by this is that the structures and the systems of the body of a man is similar to the systems of earth. The tides are like the breathing, the rivers are like the circulatory system, and in a way you could think of life as the cells of the world. What are humans?

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  • "Study me, reader, if you delight in me, because on very few occasions shall I return to the world, and because the patience for this profession is found in very few, and only in those who wish to compose things a new, come, oh men, to see the miracles that such studies will disclose to nature."
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  • An animation simulating blinking and then focusing on one of Leonardo’s sketches - a preparation for his painting - Adoration of the Magi. Leo actually specifically designed some of his artworks to cause optical illusions based on how your eye focuses after blinking. 

    (Source: discoveringdavinci.com)

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  • "The principal muscles of the shoulder are three, that is b c d; and there are two lateral ones which move it forwards and backwards, that is and a moves it forwards and o pulls it backwards and b c d upwards; upwards and forwards a b c upwards and backwards cd c downwards its own weight is almost enough.

    The muscle b is united with the muscles c when the arm moves forwards, and in returning back the muscle a is united with muscle c.” - Leonardo da Vinci

    Sketches by Leonardo about the movements of the muscles of the shoulder. He included another animated sketch of characters fighting on horseback to allude to the movements of the muscles. 

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  • discoveringdavinci:

    Leonardo’s “Flower of Life” – c. 1478-1519. Codex Atlanticus Fol 307v

    A “flower of life” is a geometrical figure that is made by creating 7 or more superimposed and evenly-spaced circles. The center of each circle is on the circumference of up to six neighboring circles of the same diameter. It’s thought, by some, to be a representation of the “Tree of life” and a symbol of “sacred geometry” that exemplifies a mathematical link to the divine. 

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  • A page of random sketches of horses and gears from Leonardo da Vinci’s notebooks. 

    (Source: discoveringdavinci.com)

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  • "Mona Lisa’s Sisters" 

    These are copies of the Mona Lisa made by contemporaries of Leonardo up until the advent of photography. Note how the backgrounds differ and that some include the pillars on each side and others do not. It’s possible some of these are copies of copies or of other similar versions. 

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  • The Mona Lisa morphing into Leonardo da Vinci’s self portrait. Read more about this -> here. 

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  • The Mona Lisa morphing into Leonardo da Vinci’s self portrait. Read more about this -> here. 

    Click here to see a higher quality Gif. 

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  • This is how some of Leonardo’s notebook pages are stored and presented by the Royal Collection Trust. Most of this particular collection  stems back to 1690. Leonardo left his notebooks to his assistant Melzi who’s family then eventually sold them. Some of them went to the Royal Collection while others went else where. Today the individual collection of notebooks and sketches are referred to as Codex ___. (Windsor, Arundel, Atlanticus, Leicester, Madrid etc.) which really only means that a certain and sometimes random collection of Leonardo’s notebooks ended up together and owned by __. It doesn’t necessarily mean that is how Leonardo intended for them to be combined or that some of them are out of place. Codex Leicester was actually bought by Bill Gates for over 30 million. You can read more about the different Codexes here

    Pictured here is a single page from Leonardo’s notebooks showing front and back (Verso) that is housed in the Royal Collection trust. It explains how to draw a deluge and shows some sketches. 

     

    • Creator: Leonardo da Vinci (Vinci 1452-Amboise 1519) (artist)
    • Creation Date: c.1517-18
    • Materials: Pen and ink
    • Dimensions: 30.1 x 20.9 cm
    • Acquirer: Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-85)
    Provenance: 
    Bequeathed to Francesco Melzi; from whose heirs purchased by Pompeo Leoni, c.1582-90; Thomas Howard, 2nd Earl of Arundel, by 1630; Probably acquired by Charles II; Royal Collection by 1690

    Description:

    Recto: a sheet of instructions in Leonardo’s handwriting describing how to paint a Deluge, illustrated by seven slight sketches.

    Verso: a description of a Deluge in Leonardo’s handwriting, illustrated by three slight sketches.

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